The glass essay anne carson

The glass essay anne carson

i get this guy's point, anne carson's poetry is western culture taken apart and put back together again, but it's annoyingly facile. carson includes a fragment of a letter by her mother asking michael for an address where she might send a “box for christmas. inside is an accordion-style, full-color reproduction of the notebook, which incorporates pasted-in photographs, poems, collages, paintings, and a letter michael once wrote home, along with fragments typed by carson. carson tells of an ancient writer named hekataios, who recounts the story of an arabian phoenix that travelled to egypt every five hundred years to bury its father: the phoenix mourns by shaping, weighing, testing, hollowing, plugging and carrying towards the light. i was wary that the book would not be able to keep up its running start from "a glass essay," but i was intrigued by "tv men," and so entranced by "the fall of rome" that i started it over again when i read the last installment, before going on to the rest of the book.. eliot prize for poetry for the beauty of the husband: a fictional essay in 29 tangos.. eliot prize, plainwater: essays and poetry, and glass, irony and god, shortlisted for the forward prize. by marking “glass, irony and god” as want to read:Error rating book. todos que lêem anne carson gostam desse livro, mas é principalmente devido a presença de um único e fascinante poema longo (de 38 páginas) e autobiográfico intitulado the glass essay. she has published eighteen books as of 2013, all of which blend the forms of poetry, essay, prose, criticism, translation, dramatic dialogue, fiction, and non-fiction. eliot said that poetry required “an escape from personality,” and carson seems to take that seriously, but with her it’s a cleansing compulsion akin to an anorexic’s or a saint’s. here, carson describes so accurately that awkward feeling of encroaching, unwillingly, on the politeness of someone else who has no desire to see you: "a stranger is someone who stands in the doorway, drenched in confusion,and permits the dog to escape. 'glass' and 'god' are predictably good pieces with that predictably carsonian line of searching melancholy to it (this is not a bad thing), but 'the fall of rome' was good in a way i did not remember, it had a lightness and aimlessness to it, along with an easy humor. the glass essay deflates self-importance while at the same time completely validating the scarring nature of personal emotional experience; it also honors such scarring as a subject worthy of poetry―perhaps not the most casual thing to do in the early 1990s, as american poetry was walking away from confessionalist bequests. 'the gender of sound' & 'the book of isaiah' & possibly more) because that was what the library had and apparently the full collection is better but 2) (sacrilege) i think i prefer reading anne carson in small doses and i think a lot of it would be better enjoyed with a cursory knowledge of the things anne carson enjoys and references in the poems here, like i can appreciate the fine scale aspects of the work but not necessarily the big picture, i can't decide if that's just a product of certain things having specific audiences or some failing on anne carson's part to be more accessible to your average joe. or more likely: come home alone and even more despondent and sad, and go back to anne carson and dana ward and read until i go to sleep; or more realistically, even: read, then try to watch porn but end up lying in bed with a hand in my shorts and an arm over my eyes until i finally, finally drift off to bad dreams about loveless days and a lonely death.

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michael had run away from home in 1978, and he and anne had spoken a half-dozen times in all the years since. there's a lot of discussion about religion, the fall of rome, as well and towards the end she has a short essay titled the gender of sound which discusses the way people feel when they hear a woman speak versus a man. “prowling the meanings of a word, prowling the history of a person, no use expecting a flood of light,” carson writes. "the glass essay" and "the gender of sound" are the only two essays/poems worth reading, imho, and i'm not as crazy about the former as everyone else seems to be.” for a poem sparked by a break-up, with the heart-slinging, fate-slapping wuthering heights as ur-text, the tone of the glass essay is thrillingly, devastatingly, deadpan. there, where “the april light is clear as an alarm,” where “the bare blue trees and bleached wooden sky” carve into her “with knives of light,” carson’s speaker gets down to the work of trying to understand what has happened to her. (to achieve the yellowing effect, carson soaked her typescript of the poem overnight in tea. elsewhere we find illustrative phrases that pretend to explain a word but really speak of carson’s brother: “he lets in night at the eyes and the heart” or “made sadder by the brother’s night than by the brother himself. as always, carson is able to sustain multiple narratives within the same poetic work; the story of narrator-mother, of narrator-law, of thou-thou, of charlotte and emily bronte, of narrator-emily--these talk back and forth as if they are all happening at once. in the haze of my formative reading, this book was lost in the shuffle among all the other carson books. carson blends themes and characters and areas of interest i find fascinating, but if the classics and the brontes aren't really your thing, know you might need to have a bit more patience here with the poetry. when herodotus was recounting a story he didn’t fully believe, carson notes, he wound up “with a remark like this: so much for what is said by the egyptians.”) her autobiographical writing is always offset by some other story; one of her best-known works, “the glass essay,” which appeared in 1995, is narrated by a woman who, devastated by the end of a relationship, goes home to see her mother, and reflects both on her ex-lover and on emily brontë’s poems; her interest in brontë’s severity comes to bear on her understanding of her own heartbreak. next year, random house will publish decreation—the eponymously titled opera—alongside new poems and essays. the 1970s carson studied classics at the university of toronto and then ancient greek with the renowned classical scholar kenneth dover at the university of st. instead of imposing baroque form on the material, carson lets michael haunt the work, writing into its lacunae, through the eeriness of his handwriting, of the airmail stamps he used.

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Verglas: Narrative Technique in Anne Carson's “The Glass Essay”

there is also, though, a “real” essay in the book, which i did not much care for at all. i'm not qualified to answer the question, but anne carson may be the great poet of my personal, reading lifetime so far, at least. the right-hand pages meditate on the difficulty of elegizing a brother who had disappeared from carson’s life long before his death. “you can never know enough, never work enough, never use the infinitives and participles oddly enough, never impede the movement harshly enough, never leave the mind quickly enough,” she wrote in “plainwater” (1995), a peculiar assortment of essays, “short talks,” and long poems with faux-scholarly introductions, the kind that might be written by someone steeped in gertrude stein and french theory. carson is a canadian poet, essayist, translator and professor of classics. today, carson lives in ann arbor, where she teaches classics and comparative literature at the university of michigan.) that says, following an arrow drawn from anne carson's name, "she is a very bookish poet. ik weet niet of ik dat ooit zal kunnen, of iemand anders dan carson dat ooit zal kunnen., irony and god,Be the first to ask a question about glass, irony and god."the glass essay" is the five-star moment of this collection. you look back on “the glass essay,” for example, do you consider it a personal poem? canadian venues were considerably less welcoming, and it was not until carson was forty-two that a small canadian pub- lisher, brick books, published her first book of poems, short talks. as always, carson is able to sustain multiple narratives within the same poetic work; the story of narrator-mother, of narrator-law, of thou-thou, of charlotte and emily bronte, of narrator-emily--these talk back and forth as if they are all happening at once. ‘the glass essay’flesh in after-glow math, reading without the lights. of note is her ability to move--fluidly or jarringly--between lyric and narrative moments in this essay.” in her subsequent books, most notably in “plainwater,” “glass, irony & god” (1995), “autobiography of red” (1998), and “the beauty of the husband” (2001), carson developed her interest in sex, identity, and ecstatic transformation, in the form of lyric narratives that often seemed highly personal.

The Glass Essay by Anne Carson | Poetry Foundation

At Length » Short Takes on Long Poems, Volume 1

carson’s thirty-six page poem the glass essay, from 1995’s glass, irony and god, turns on the most precarious of pivots: love lost. “to be a whacher is not in itself sad or happy,” carson writes; she’s describing bronte but it’s a key too to understanding the poem’s tonal attitude, so at odds with the excruciating pain we know, via image and quotation, the speaker is feeling (the poem is a triumph of the objective correlative):When law left i felt so bad i thought i would die. translation, the act of renaming, is clearly crucial to carson’s method of coming to grips with loss. there are a few perfect things in this world and sometimes they show up in the form of a book, leaves of grass, a hundred years of solitude, and in my opinion 2 books by anne carson- this one and autobiography of red. this collection includes: "the glass essay," a powerful poem about the end of a love affair, told in the context of carson's reading of the brontë sisters; "book of isaiah," a poem evoking the deeply primitive feel of ancient judaism; and "the fall of rome," about her trip to "find" rome and her struggle to overcome feelings of a terrible alienation there. in the poem, carson writes, “my questions were not original. carson blends themes and characters and areas of interest i find fascinating, but if the classics and the brontes aren't really your thing, know you might need to have a bit more patience here with the poetry. most favorite thing about this book is the glass essay which discusses emily dickinson, a daughter and mother, etc. “the glass essay” opens: i can hear little clicks inside my dream. as guy davenport’s introduction to the collection explains, though, carson’s poems can seem like verse essays: “she writes in a kind of mathematics of the emotions, with daring equations and recurring sets and subsets of images. the essay at the end, "the gender of sound" provides clues for you to unravel when reading plainwater, which would be a sma.”  emerson rendered passionate and alive thoughts in his essays— life-changing thoughts, which he generated from his journals— but he couldn’t do it in his poems and this killed them, probably because no matter how he coached himself he was unable to write poems without an inherited preconceived notion of how a poem sounds.) that says, following an arrow drawn from anne carson's name, "she is a very bookish poet. glass essay is by far my favourite of the book, raw and incredibly powerful. the past several years, carson has been working on a spoken-word opera about three women mystics—aphrodite, the fourteenth-century french heretic marguerite porete, and simone weil. the primary difference between carson’s nudes and plath’s lady lazarus is that carson’s speaker doesn’t take personally the emotional stripping loss compels; she recognizes it as part of the soul-hewing in the “wild workshop,” a hewing that, in the quest to “carry this clarity with me,” she endures until the last page’s last nude, whose bones stand “silver and necessary/…the body of us all.

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Glass, Irony and God by Anne Carson — Reviews, Discussion

todos que lêem anne carson gostam desse livro, mas é principalmente devido a presença de um único e fascinante poema longo (de 38 páginas) e autobiográfico intitulado the glass essay. her essays, her poems, all sublime, all searching and weaving personal history with greek legend, the search for ourselves in our language, in our civilizations. i came to this book mostly interested in carson's poem "the fall of rome", but this is a jamesian excercise in place: more a meditation of the internal feeling of foreign-ness than a meditation on landscape, which i was looking for. most favorite thing about this book is the glass essay which discusses emily dickinson, a daughter and mother, etc. carson has always been interested in pockets of experience that can’t be approached directly but must be courted obliquely." the final essay of the collection, "the gender of sound," though, was by far the highlight of the text. this:emailprinttweet by nicole | 19 december, 2011 | category: anne carson | tags: 20th century, canadian literature, poetry |. anyway the glass essay is an amazing novel but you knew that already (also, funnily enough after that previous paragraph, owes the least to western culture or whatever—brontes, a bit of proust).” is the range of the work that you do—poetry, essays, opera, academic work, teaching—a way of trying to punch windows in the walls of the self? so when carson shapes something new, it carries in its new sprigs the massive weight of western thought. carson's poem "book of isaiah" is great in its fear and dependency and resonates as a gender-bending hellish relationship based in power (god's and isaiah's), responsibility (isaiah's), and the fear of abandonment (god's).” if all this orchestration sounds elaborate, even artificial, it’s quintessential carson.) the poem revolves around a stand in for anne carson who has recently broken up with a great love. carson’s longstanding interest in emily bronte fits perfectly with my perception of her emotional tenor. the interview that follows is a mix of our usual conversation and discussion about topics that preoccupy carson’s work—mysticism, antiquity, obsession, desire. muitos leitores já falaram de the glass essay, e não tenho nada mais o que falar exceto concordar.

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"The Glass Essay" by Anne Carson - bibliographing

it took two weeks for the news to reach carson, a canadian-born classicist and poet, because michael’s widow couldn’t find her number in her husband’s papers. carson is also a classics scholar, the translator of if not, winter: fragments of sappho, and the author of eros the bittersweet.. i love carson, i think she's a genius, and i think this is a pretty weak book. "the glass essay," for me, might be one of the most powerful break-up poems i've read.”) carson understands personal experience as much through philosophy and spiritual writings as through the register of psychology and interiority. in short order, three collections of poems and essays appeared—plainwater: essays and poetry (1995); glass, irony and god (1995); men in the off hours (2000)—as well as a verse novel, autobiography of red (1998), which seamlessly blends greek myth, homosexuality, and small-town ontario life. the beauty of the husband, nox, and plainwater remain the books of carson's of which i am most in awe. the carson method involves a kind of mashup of old and new; she proceeds through juxtaposition rather than metaphor-making. it’s an old question, but in carson’s hands it becomes vibrant with physical drama: herakles lies like a piece of torn silk in the heat of the blue saying geryon please. where shakespeare built his great plays through the structure of a double plot—a main plot offset by a subplot—carson builds her narrative lyrics by means of triangulation, or what she once called “a third angle of vision. anne carson's just making explicit what's implicit in all literature maybe."a really great collection of poetry and essay, crowned with 'the glass essay': a meditation on lost love, mortality, and emily bronte's wuthering heights , with charlotte bronte as guide. in the haze of my formative reading, this book was lost in the shuffle among all the other carson books. as usual i’m intrigued by the one negative thing in your post, and want to hear more about the essay you didn’t like. my favourite poem/essay of all time and is pretty much brain-stretching brilliance throughout. ‘the glass essay’flesh in after-glow math, reading without the lights.

The Unfolding - The New Yorker

carson means for her accordion to capture that shadow play, these fugitive visions., irony and god is a series of poems (i'm tempted to call them "narrative poems" because of the potent sensations of scene, character, and movement) and one essay (the inclusion of which almost knocked it down a star for me, until i began thinking on the overall themes) about the soul under pressure. carson lived in montreal for several years and taught at mcgill university, the university of michigan, and at princeton university from 1980-1987. exhausted by the joyous demands of the season, carson stretched out on an orange velveteen sofa and we talked—fortified by cups of oolong tea—for several hours. carson’s first entry in “nox” displays a characteristic combination of the lyric and the gnomic: “i wanted to fill my elegy with light of all kinds."a really great collection of poetry and essay, crowned with 'the glass essay': a meditation on lost love, mortality, and emily bronte's. as good as "book of isaiah" is, it's "the fall of rome" and even, more, "the glass essay" which are the knock outs here. the mid-nineties, carson was no longer trying to find publishers; rather, publishers were clamoring to find her. as a remarkable classicist, anne carson weaves contemporary and ancient poetic strands with stunning style in glass, irony and god. of my favorite things about carson is how she describes so much sensory experience so quickly, in a way that seems so effortless it must not be, and becomes slippery when you look at it hard but feels just right as you read it. 'glass' and 'god' are predictably good pieces with that predictably carsonian line of searching melancholy to it (this is not a bad thing), but 'the fall of rome' was good in a way i did not remember, it had a lightness and aimlessness to it, along with an easy humor. anne carson's writing seems to reveal that historical, emotional, and metaphorical narratives hum along all the time below our present-times. i was wary that the book would not be able to keep up its running start from "a glass essay," but i was intrigued by "tv men," and so entranced by "the fall of rome" that i started it over again when i read the last installment, before going on to the rest of the book.”  for this task, whitman designed what he called a “transparent, plate-glassy style” for the democratic bible that emerson famously praised as “the most extraordinary piece of wit and wisdom america has yet produced,” full of “incomparable things said incomparably well, as they must be. “lozenges” are particularly apt, i thought—like pieces of stained glass to look through at the past, small physical things you could grab to get that past back. ‘the glass essay’; las het nu voor de derde keer en weer dacht ik: dit is 't beste dat ik ooit heb gelezen.

Paris Review - Anne Carson, The Art of Poetry No. 88

’s an interesting question, whether carson is an emotional writer or not. carson’s singular gift for resuscitating the ancient theme of desire is complicated by a postmodern habit of pastiche and fragmentation. what carson says about her subject is, well, just read the thing and find out for yourself.. ik zal niet doen alsof ik begrijp wat anne carson allemaal zegt en ziet en denkt.” elegy and history are akin, carson notes, and she invokes herodotus, the father of history, as her guide.“the glass essay” is, roughly, the story of the aftermath of a breakup between the narrator and her partner law, after which she goes back home to spend time with her mother (her father is in an elder care home). anne carson always remains fresh, sharp and although her patterns of writing become more exposed with each book one reads, her style is chameleonic thanks to her ability to stave off the caricature-able nature that other writers find themselves in after such a prolific and well received career. her books include antigonick, nox, decreation, the beauty of the husband: a fictional essay in 29 tangos, winner of the t. o anne you wound me) actually, is book of isaiah, which utterly slays ("new pain!” it’s one reason why i return to “the jerboa”—and marianne moore—so frequently: to see how my own definition of art continues to change, and to test it against moore’s own bracing examinations. so all the god stuff in this book didn't do much for me (and that includes carson's frequent mention of soul etc.—but at a certain point he feels a lack,” carson has written. if anything, i find that carson sometimes runs the risk of being histrionic (something that i have less of a problem with than many people, since i go for the visceral), but usually she turns this to her advantage.’m compiling a short list of poets to read next year and have put anne carson on the list. so we bounce between anne's reflections on her dead relationship; her current stunted relationship with her mom, the landscape of the moors, and her senile father; and her (and others) relations to and reflections on the unknowable emily. so all the god stuff in this book didn't do much for me (and that includes carson's frequent mention of soul etc.

Verglas: Narrative Technique in Anne Carson¬タルs ¬タワThe Glass

Winged Ink: Anne Carson's 'The glass essay'

but anyway i'll just be here crying at how good anne carson is at playing on the ways words can swing into different meanings (nation, in this part of the poem, and also save) and the way these words' ambiguity/multiplicity of meaning result in a sort of essential meaninglessness/lack of understanding similar to the absurdity of trying to understand god. the essay at the end, "the gender of sound" provides clues for you to unravel when reading plainwater, which would be a smart next step.. richards and progressed, most notably, through the new critics) and what franco moretti has polemically called “distant reading” (a recent methodology, outlined in the essay “conjectures on world literature,” which involves not the careful scrutiny of particular texts but the synthesis and analysis of large sets of quantitative data in order “to focus on units that are much smaller or much larger than the text: devices, themes, tropes—or genres and systems. she has always been reluctant to call herself a poet, carson has been writing some heretic form of poetry almost all her life. the entries read like litanies—words you might utter as a stay against panic or darkness—and when you look closely you see that carson has messed with the latin examples, introducing the word “night,” creating atmospheric little prose poems of the translated phrases. i'm not qualified to answer the question, but anne carson may be the great poet of my personal, reading lifetime so far, at least. maybe one day i'll be able to talk about the other poems/essays/word constructions in this book. i came to this book mostly interested in carson's poem "the fall of rome", but this is a jamesian excercise in place: more a meditation of the internal feeling of foreign-ness than a meditation on landscape, which i was looking for. i cannot properly explain my thoughts about this book but anne carson is seriously one of my favorite writers of all time with the way she tackles form and greek mythology and makes the reader think more outside the box. of note is her ability to move--fluidly or jarringly--between lyric and narrative moments in this essay.” in carson’s work, this poverty is figured as a form of unexpected wealth. a plain vernacular dante would approve of, charles martin writes of the towers “burning”:Together, like a secret brought to light,Like something we’d imagined but not known,The intersection of such speed, such height—. was born on june 21, 1950, in toronto, the second and final child of margaret and robert carson. this collection includes: "the glass essay," a powerful poem about the end of a love affair, told in the context of carson's reading of the brontë sisters; "book of isaiah," a poem evoking the deeply primitive feel of ancient judaism; an. a sense of this is what carson’s memory book provides; its process of assemblage dramatizes the way the mind in mourning flits from pain at the specific loss to metaphysical questioning about what, exactly, constitutes a mortal life." the final essay of the collection, "the gender of sound," though, was by far the highlight of the text.

there's a lot of discussion about religion, the fall of rome, as well and towards the end she has a short essay titled the gender of sound which discusses the w. in 2002 carson became the first woman to receive england’s t. anyway, i like that dissonance or rawness between carson’s seeming intellectualism and the emotion in her work. 'the gender of sound' & 'the book of isaiah' & possibly more) because that was what the library had and apparently the full collection is better but 2) (sacrilege) i think i prefer reading anne carson in small doses and i think a lot of it would be better enjoyed with a cursory knowledge of the things anne carson enjoys and references in the poems here, like i can appreciate the fine scale aspects of the work but not necessarily. an interesting look into the gendered politicization of sound, this final essay leaves the reader to think about him/herself and why s/he does what s/he does and thinks the way s/he thinks. carson is a canadian poet, essayist, translator and professor of classics. carson lived in montreal for several years and taught at mcgill university, the university of michigan, and at princeton university from 1980-1987. carson, whose quite faithful rendering this is, wants to memorialize the dead, but she also wonders why she does—why we feel the need, as catullus says, to speak to silent ashes, to assemble trivial remnants of a lost presence. i'm sad that charlotte acted to keep anne from readers. so when carson shapes something new, it carries in its new sprigs the massive weight of western thought. the big secret of glass, irony and god, (only negative of anne carson: she doesn't use oxford commas?, i can’t believe that anyone would think carson unemotional; it’s as though the mere presence of intellectual content tags someone as cold or cerebral (particularly if it is a female writer). read wuthering heights in order to re-read the glass essay. 2000, anne carson’s older brother michael died unexpectedly in copenhagen. she (carson) brings along the complete works of emily bronte. ik weet niet of dat wel de bedoeling is, van poëzie, van carsons poëzie.

as a remarkable classicist, anne carson weaves contemporary and ancient poetic strands with stunning style in glass, irony and god. sometimes i get the feeling that particular cultural references could almost be interchangeable because carson has fixed on an emotion and is going to wrangle whatever material she touches into that shape regardless.“the glass essay” was far and away my favorite poem in the collection, though the others were mostly good as well. as an alarm: 675 words on anne carson’s the glass essay.” somewhere along the way, he began dealing drugs and he ran away to avoid going to jail, after staying with carson a few days (and leaving cigarette butts everywhere, even in the frying pan, “sunny side up”). for example, “the glass essay” began with staring at a frozen ditch near my mother’s house, which i think actually occurs in the poem somewhere.”nobody discusses god(s) like anne carson - brilliant, raw, and overflowing with intelligence. i cannot properly explain my thoughts about this book but anne carson is seriously one of my favorite writers of all time with the way she tackles form and greek mythology and makes the reader think more outside the box."the glass essay" is the five-star moment of this collection. but when i wrote “the glass essay,” i also wanted to do something that i would call understanding what life feels like, and i don’t believe i did. carson and i first met in 1988 at a writers’ workshop in canada, and have been reading each other’s work ever since.“the glass essay” by anne carson the first poem in anne carson’s glass, irony & god is called “the glass essay,” and if you’re anything like me, the title might seem odd.’ll definitely make sure to get to the “real” essay. other note…this particular poem reminded me a bit of anne stevenson, who ought to be better known. nox is also the roman goddess of night—perhaps the oldest of the roman deities, the mother, by many accounts, of sleep, fate, and death—and in carson’s elegy night becomes a kind of elusive character, with whom the mourner repeatedly attempts to engage. in many of her strongest pieces, such as “just for the thrill: an essay on the differences between women and men” (a series of prose fragments which appeared in “plainwater”), her speakers appear to be preoccupied by the troubling proximity between what they experience as the annihilating transport of sex and the visionary transport of the sublime.

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